A history of baroque era

Baroque painting originated in Italy and spread north.

A history of baroque era

Baroque painting originated in Italy and spread north. One of its Italian creators was Michelangelo da Caravaggiowhose bold and light-bathed naturalism impressed many northern artists.

The Italian influence was evident in the works of Peter Paul Rubensa well-known Flemish artist who chose themes from pagan and Christian literature, illustrating them with human figures involved in dramatic physical action. Another famous Baroque court painter was Diego Velasquezwhose canvases depict the haughty formality and opulence of the Spanish royal household.

A number of Italian women were successful Baroque painters, including Livonia Fontanawho produced pictures of monumental buildings, and Artemesia Gentileschia follower of Caravaggio.

While the Baroque style profoundly affected the rest of Europe, the Dutch perfected their own characteristic style, which grew directly from their pride in political and commerical accomplishments and emphasized the beauty of local nature and the solidity of middle class life.

Dutch painting was sober, detailed, and warmly soft in the use of colors, particularly yellows and browns. Almost every town in Holland supported its own school of painters who helped perpetuate local traditions. Consequently a horde of competent artists arose to meet the demand for this republican art.

Only a few among hundreds can be cited here.

A history of baroque era

The robust Frans Hals employed a vigorous style that enabled him to catch the spontaneous and fleeting expression of his portrait subjects. He left posterity a gallery of types - from cavaliers to fishwives and tavern loungers. Somewhat in contrast, Jan Vermeer exhibited a subtle delicacy.

His way of treating the fall of subdued sunlight upon interior scenes has never been equaled. Towering above all the Dutch artists - and ranking with the outstanding painters of all time - was Rembrandt van Rijn While reflecting the common characteristics of his school, he produced works so universally human that they not only expressed Dutch cultural values but also transcended them.

His canvasses show tremendous sensitivity, depicting almost every human emotion except pure joy. This omission arose partially from his own troubled consciousness and partially from his republican, Calvinist environment. Nevertheless, his work furnished profound insights into the human enigma. He has been called the "Dutch Baroque version of da Vinci.

The most renowned architect of the school in the seventeenth century was Giovanni Bernini He designed the colonnades outside St.

[BINGSNIPMIX-3

Hundreds of churches and public buildings all over Europe displayed the elaborate Baroque decorativeness in colored marble, intricate designs, twisted columns, scattered cupolas, imposing facades, and unbalanced extensions or bulges.

Stone and mortar were often blended with statuary and painting; indeed it was difficult to see where one art left off and the other began. The seventeenth century also brought Baroque innovations in music. New forms of expression moved away from the exalted calmness of Palestrina and emphasized melody supported by harmony.

Instrumental music - particularly for organ and violin - gained equal popularity, for the first time, with song. Outstanding among Baroque innovations was opera, which originated in Italy at the beginning of the century and quickly conquered Europe. The new form utilized many arts, integrating literature, drama, music and painting of the elaborate stage settings.

The literature of the Baroque age before showed a marked decline from the exalted heights of the northern Renaissance. Even beforehowever, Puritanism and the Counter-Reformation inclined many writers toward religious subjects.

In England, this trend continued in the next century and was augmented by a flood of political tracts during the civil war.

Religious concerns were typical of the two most prominent English poets, John Donne and John Milton French literature during the early s was much less memorable. The major advance came in heroic adventure novels, pioneered by Madeleine Scudery Most other French writers, influenced by the newly formed French Academy, were increasingly active in salon discussions but more concerned with form than with substance.Artists by Movement: Rococo Art Europe, to Rococo Art succeeded Baroque Art in Europe.

It was most popular in France, and is generally associated with the reign of King Louis XV (). Baroque music (US: / b ə ˈ r oʊ k / or UK: / b ə ˈ r ɒ k /) is a period or style of Western art music composed from approximately to This era followed the Renaissance music era, and was followed in turn by the Classical attheheels.come music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, and is now widely studied, performed, and listened attheheels.com composers of the Baroque era.

Baroque: architecture, sculpture, painting is a book of HF Ullmann Publishing from "The Essence of Culture" series edited by the renowned editor Rolf Toman. While the Baroque style profoundly affected the rest of Europe, the Dutch perfected their own characteristic style, which grew directly from their pride in political and commerical accomplishments and emphasized the beauty of local.

It was characteristic of Baroque architecture that, though examples are to be found almost throughout Europe and Latin America, they differ notably from one country to another. How is it, then, that they are all designated by a single term? Partly for convenience, in order to summarize the art of a.

Baroque art and architecture: Baroque art and architecture, the visual arts and building design and construction produced during the era in the history of Western art that roughly coincides with the 17th century.

The earliest manifestations, which occurred in Italy, .

The Baroque Era In The Arts